Government Advocacy

February 22, 2018: MGMA to CMS: Allow ACOs three more years in Track 1

Advocacy Letter

Medicare Payment Policies

Quality Payment Program

February 22, 2018 
 
Ms. Seema Verma
Administrator  
Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services  
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services  
Hubert H. Humphrey Building  
200 Independence Avenue, S.W.  
Washington, DC 20201  
 
 
Re: Request for a third agreement period for certain ACOs in Medicare Shared Savings Program (MSSP) Track 1  
 
 
Dear Administrator Verma: 
 
The undersigned organizations write to request that CMS modify regulations at §425.600(b) to allow certain ACOs to continue in the Medicare Shared Savings Program (MSSP) Track 1 for a third agreement period before having to move to a two-sided model. Our recommendations reflect our unified expectation and desire to see the MSSP achieve the long-term sustainability necessary to enhance care coordination for Medicare beneficiaries, lower the growth rate of healthcare spending and improve quality in the Medicare program. Specifically, our key goals for the MSSP include encouraging increased participation, enabling ACOs to continue in the program and creating a successful, long-term ACO model for Medicare. It is in Medicare’s interest for ACOs to continue in order to provide high quality care for beneficiaries and to reduce the growth rate of Medicare spending. 
 
MSSP Track 1 remains by far the most popular option for ACOs, representing 82 percent of MSSP ACOs in 2018. However, ACOs may only remain in Track 1 for two agreement periods before being required to move to a two-sided risk model or drop out of the program. Many ACOs remain in Track 1 because they are unprepared to assume risk requiring them to potentially pay millions of dollars to Medicare, which is simply not practical or feasible for most of these organizations. Providers in rural areas and safety-net providers, which care for some of the most vulnerable patient populations, often face even greater challenges than other providers when considering taking on risk. However, the challenge of being forced into risk is of great importance to ACOs of all sizes, composition and ownership. The financial position and backing of a particular ACO as well as the ability to assume risk depends on a variety of factors, such as local market dynamics, culture, leadership, financial status, and the resources required to address social determinants of health that influence care and outcomes for patients with complex needs.  
 
ACOs that began the MSSP in 2012 or 2013 entered into second agreement periods in 2016 and are on schedule for their third agreement periods to begin in 2019. This is the first time ACOs will be forced into a two-sided risk arrangement. These ACOs are the first MSSP cohort and those that remain have shown significant dedication to the ACO model. They embraced the MSSP early on and were instrumental in working collaboratively with one another and CMS to help shape the program. 
These ACOs have faced a number of challenges, some of which have been addressed by CMS through regulatory changes but many program modifications are still needed. The MSSP and these ACOs have evolved considerably, creating a shifting landscape for these early adopters. In order for ACOs to make a thoughtful business decision to assume risk, they need predictability and positive performance results. Without that, many do not feel confident enough to assume risk. These ACOs need more time to prepare for two-sided risk. While six years may sound sufficient, given the programmatic changes and considerable learning curve for these ACOs, this is not enough time. Further, when they have to make their decision about 2019 participation these ACOs will only have performance data available for four performance years, 2012/2013 through 2016. Based on evaluation of the four performance years for which data is available, we urge CMS to allow Track 1 ACOs that meet at least one of the criteria below to have the option to continue in Track 1 for a third agreement period.

 

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